U.S. Treasury Yield – 10Y-2Y vs. 30Y-10Y

U.S. Treasury Yield – 10Y-2Y vs. 30Y-10Y Morgan Stanley forecasts the 10-year Treasury yield at about 1% by the end of the year. Image: Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

10Y-2Y Yield Curve and U.S. Recession

10Y-2Y Yield Curve and U.S. Recession The U.S. yield curve is steepening and suggests optimism for 2020, as investors become more confident in the U.S. economy. Image: Financial Times

Yield Curve 10Y-2Y and U.S. ISM Manufacturing Index

Yield Curve 10Y-2Y and U.S. ISM Manufacturing Index Chart suggesting that the 10Y-2Y spread (YoY) leads the U.S. ISM Manufacturing Index (YoY) by 18 months. U.S. PMI could bounce back in 2020. Image: Nordea and Macrobond

10Y-2Y Yield Curve Inversion Until U.S. Recession Starts

10Y-2Y Yield Curve Inversion Until U.S. Recession Starts An inverted yield curve doesn’t always mean that a recession is imminent. But historically, a sustained yield curve inversion has been a good indicator of recession. Image: Legg Mason

10Y-2Y Yield Curve Inversion vs. S&P 500 Peaks

10Y-2Y Yield Curve Inversion vs. S&P 500 Peaks Chart suggesting that the S&P 500 Index should not peak until June 2020. In recent history, the S&P 500 Index peaks 10 months on average after the 10Y-2Y yield curve inverts. Image: Jeroen Blokland