Ken Fisher on the Yield Curve​

Ken Fisher on the Yield Curve In this short video, Ken Fisher explains what the yield curve is and its impact on the market. You may also like other videos by Ken Fisher.

“Ken Fisher: Thinking in Ways That Others Do Not, with John Tamny”

“Ken Fisher: Thinking in Ways That Others Do Not, with John Tamny” Great interview of Ken Fisher on: coastal redwoods, dikes and climate change, efficient markets, quantitative easing (QE) vs. inflation, humans as a group are slow to learn, recessions, Fed and interest rates, why philanthropy is bad and immoral, and why inequality is a good…

Ken Fisher: ‘Third year of a president’s term is positive’

Ken Fisher: ‘Third year of a president’s term is positive’ “…because political risk aversion falls as you get to increase gridlock which happends in every midterm election.” Billionaire Ken Fisher thinks there is room to run for the stock market this year. But don’t try to time the market and keep your investment strategy simple.

Ken Fisher on What to Expect in 2019 | Fisher Investments

Ken Fisher on What to Expect in 2019 | Fisher Investments Ken Fisher, founder of Fisher Investments, tells us why he believes 2019 will be a strong year for stocks in a fine global economy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYdrFfpMuVw

Unemployment and U.S. Presidential Elections

Unemployment and U.S. Presidential Elections Americans tend to elect Democrats when unemployment is high, and Republicans when unemployment is low. Picture source: Ken Fisher

“Yield Curve” Google Trends vs. 10Y-3M Yield Spread

“Yield Curve” Google Trends vs. 10Y-3M Yield Spread This interesting chart shows the Google trends interest for the “yield curve” compared to the U.S. 10-year minus 3-month Treasury yield spread. If history helps us predict the future, the next market peak could be in 2021 or later, maybe. Picture source: Ken Fisher

Who Has the Most To Lose in US-China Trade War?

Who Has the Most To Lose in US-China Trade War? The tariffs are no threat and China has more to lose economically in a trade war. Those numbers are estimates but in reality wrong ones and far too high, according to Ken Fisher. Picture source: Oxford Economics