S&P 500 Dividend Yield and 30-Year Treasury Bond

S&P 500 Dividend Yield and 30-Year Treasury Bond Are U.S. equities a “buy”? The dividend yield of the S&P 500 Index is now higher than the yield from a 30-year Treasury bond. This is a rare phenomenon. But keep in mind that the equity risk does not disappear because a company pays a dividend. Picture…

S&P 500 Dividend Payers / Non-Payers Around First Fed Rate Cut

S&P 500 Dividend Payers / Non-Payers Around First Fed Rate Cut The chart shows that S&P 500 dividend payers have outperformed non-payers around the first Fed rate cut and 12 months later, because they are more attractive than bonds. Picture source: Ned Davis Research

S&P 500 Dividend Yield vs. 10-Year Treasury Yield since 2009

S&P 500 Dividend Yield vs. 10-Year Treasury Yield since 2009 This chart shows the gap between S&P 500 dividend yield and the 10-year Treasury yield since 2009. Keep in mind that investing is not just a competition between stocks and bonds. But for the first time since 2017, the dividend yield on US stocks is equal…

S&P 500 Dividend Yield Since 1871

S&P 500 Dividend Yield Since 1871 Since 1871, the long-term average dividend yield for the US stock market is 4.34%. The current yield of the S&P500 is 1.87% Is there an anomaly in the past 20 years? Picture source: multpl.com

Dividend Yield of S&P 500 Components

Dividend Yield of S&P 500 Components Yields on equities seem competitive vs. U.S. Treasuries, but equity risk does not disappear because a company pays a dividend. Picture source: Bespoke Investment Group

S&P 500 – Price vs. Dividends

S&P 500 – Price vs. Dividends What happens to dividends when there’s a market collapse? This interesting chart shows that dividends don’t fall as much as stocks. Picture source: A Wealth of Common Sense

S&P 500 Earnings and U.S. Capital Spending

S&P 500 Earnings and U.S. Capital Spending This chart shows that U.S. core capital spending is near a 20-year high. Are fears that U.S. companies may be curtailing spending plans overblown? Keep in mind that the absence of dividend cuts also suggests that U.S. companies are confident in their future earnings potential. Picture source: Leuthold Group