M1 Money Supply vs. Yield Curve and Recessions

M1 Money Supply vs. Yield Curve and Recessions Great chart showing the correlation between M1 money supply and the yield curve. The key factor for inverted yield curves is tight money. Picture source: BofA Merrill Lynch Global Research

China – Equity Returns and Money Supply

China – Equity Returns and Money Supply This chart shows the relationship between M2 money supply and China’s stock market since 2003. Picture source: Jeroen Blokland

What Does M1 Money Supply Growth Tell Us About the Next Recession?

What Does M1 Money Supply Growth Tell Us About the Next Recession? M1 is the money supply that includes types of money commonly used for payment, basically currency outside banks and checking account balances. This is not the perfect recession indicator, but in recent history, it turns negative at least one year before a recession.

World’s Central Banks Are Cutting Rates

World’s Central Banks Are Cutting Rates World’s central banks are lowering interest rates, in order to boost money supply in the economy and stimulate economic growth. Picture source: Charles Schwab

U.S. Excess Liquidity Growth Leads S&P 500 Returns

U.S. Excess Liquidity Growth Leads S&P 500 Returns This chart suggests that M2 money supply to nominal GDP ratio leads S&P 500 returns by one year. Is the S&P 500 vulnerable to a drop, followed by a recovery? Picture source: Oxford Economics, Macrobond

S&P 500 Index vs. Global M1 Liquidity

S&P 500 Index vs. Global M1 Liquidity Another good correlation between the S&P 500 Index and global M1 liquidity, while the Fed plans to stop quantitative tightening. The money supply M1 is the amount of effective money in the economy. Picture source: Nordea and Macrobond

How to Get Inflation?

How to Get Inflation? Mainly, inflation comes from excess money supply growth. There is too much money in the system chasing too few goods and services. Nominal GDP = M x V = P x T M = quantity of money V = velocity of circulation of money P = level of prices T =…

Where Does Inflation Come From?

Where Does Inflation Come From? Mainly inflation comes from excess money supply growth. There is too much money in the system chasing too few goods and services. Over the long term, Nominal GDP = Money Supply x Velocity of Money = Inflation + Real Economic Growth “Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon.” –Milton Friedman. You…

Why Is Core Inflation So Low Compared to Previous Business Cycles?

Why Is Core Inflation So Low Compared To Previous Business Cycles? The Consumer Price Index Less Food & Energy (Core CPI) is very low compared to previous business cycles in the US, for several reasons: – not fast-rising money supply – globalization: inflation is a global phenomenon – lack of wage acceleration – increase in…