Weaker Wage Growth in the Current Expansion

Weaker Wage Growth in the Current Expansion Interesting chart showing that wage growth is much weaker than it was in the late 1990s. Image: Economic Policy Institute

Wage Growth, Monetary Policy and S&P 500

Wage Growth, Monetary Policy and S&P 500 When the spread between wage growth and the Fed funds rate is wide, it is generally positive for equities. Image: Topdown Charts

U.S. Unemployment Rate and Wage Growth

U.S. Unemployment Rate and Wage Growth U.S. unemployment rate at 3.7% and U.S. wage growth at 3.2% in July. U.S. employment growth slows, suggesting the U.S. economy is cooling. Image: Jeroen Blokland

Wage Growth vs. U.S. Home Price Growth

Wage Growth vs. U.S. Home Price Growth This chart shows that U.S. home prices are rising faster than wages. There is clearly a widening gap between wage growth and house price. Today, houses are too expensive for most young people.

History of the Real Federal Minimum Wage

History of the Real Federal Minimum Wage Today, the real federal minimum wage is worth 31% less than in 1968. It is also the longest period without an increase (adjusted for inflation). You may also like “Wage Growth vs. U.S. Home Price Growth.” Image: Economic Policy Institute

Since 1990, No Recessions Without 4% Wage Growth

Since 1990, No Recessions Without 4% Wage Growth Since the beginning of the Great Recession, wage growth has been slow in this business cycle. But keep in mind that since 1990, no recessions without 4% wage growth. So, a recession is probably not imminent. Image: Blackrock

U.S. Productivity Growth and Hourly Compensation

U.S. Productivity Growth and Hourly Compensation When wages lag behind productivity growth, workers do not receive their fair share of the wealth created. Image: Economic Policy Institute

When Is the Next Recession Coming?

When Is the Next Recession Coming? If history helps us to predict the future, a recession can occur when: Wage Growth minus Fed Funds Rate is below -1%. Why? Because the Fed is too tight at that moment. Since 1965, a recession has never occurred until Wage Growth minus Fed Funds Rate was below -1%…