S&P 500 Performance After >20% Pre-Election Years

S&P 500 Performance After >20% Pre-Election Years Following a 20% gain in the pre-election year, the S&P 500 index has consistently shown positive growth during the election year, with an average increase in value of 11.3% since 1950. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 Performance During Election Years in the U.S.

S&P 500 Performance During Election Years The S&P 500 index typically experiences a slow start in the first quarter of an election year. However, as the year progresses, the market tends to regain momentum and deliver a solid performance. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 – Election Year Seasonality

S&P 500 – Election Year Seasonality During election years, the S&P 500 tends to trend sideways in Q1. Investors are typically cautious about the potential outcomes of the upcoming elections and tend to adopt a more conservative approach. Image: MarketDesk Research

Average S&P 500 Returns by Election Cycle Year

Average S&P 500 Returns by Election Cycle Year The dynamics and uncertainties of the electoral process often impact market performance in presidential election years, leading to a historical trend of weaker S&P 500 returns. Image: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research

S&P 500 First Year of a New President in Pre-Election Years

S&P 500 First Year of a New President in Pre-Election Years Typically, during pre-election years under a new President, the S&P 500 tends to experience a robust market rally as the election year approaches. Image: Carson Investment Research

Average Year for the S&P 500 During a Pre-Election Year

Average Year for the S&P 500 During a Pre-Election Year Historically, the third quarter of pre-election years has been characterized by weakness in the performance of the S&P 500, while the fourth quarter has exhibited strength. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 Performance 1-Year After Midterm Elections

S&P 500 Performance 1-Year After Midterm Elections Historically, the S&P 500 Index has been higher a year later every time after midterm elections in November. Image: Carson Investment Research