S&P 500 3-Month Performance During an Election Year

S&P 500 3-Month Performance During an Election Year In Presidential election years, June to August stands out as the strongest 3-month period of the year. The S&P 500 has been up 75% of the time, with an average return of 7.3% since 1928. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 Monthly Returns During an U.S. Election Year

S&P 500 Monthly Returns During an U.S. Election Year Historical data shows that the S&P 500 tends to perform strongly during the months of June, July, and August in election years, supporting the expectation of a summer rally. Image: Carson Investment Research

How the S&P 500 Performance After Big Starts to Previous Election Years

How the S&P 500 Performance After Big Starts to Previous Election Years After a strong start to the election year, the U.S. stock market tends to regain momentum towards the end of Q2 and generally continues to perform well until the end of the year. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 Performance During Election Years in the U.S.

S&P 500 Performance During Election Years The S&P 500 index generally performs poorly until Memorial Day in election years. However, as the year progresses, the market tends to regain momentum and deliver a solid performance. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 Performance After >20% Pre-Election Years

S&P 500 Performance After >20% Pre-Election Years Following a 20% gain in the pre-election year, the S&P 500 index has consistently shown positive growth during the election year, with an average increase in value of 11.3% since 1950. Image: Carson Investment Research

S&P 500 – Election Year Seasonality

S&P 500 – Election Year Seasonality During election years, the S&P 500 tends to trend sideways in Q1. Investors are typically cautious about the potential outcomes of the upcoming elections and tend to adopt a more conservative approach. Image: MarketDesk Research

Average S&P 500 Returns by Election Cycle Year

Average S&P 500 Returns by Election Cycle Year The dynamics and uncertainties of the electoral process often impact market performance in presidential election years, leading to a historical trend of weaker S&P 500 returns. Image: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research