Total Annual Health Care Spending Per U.S. Family

Total Annual Health Care Spending Per U.S. Family Headlines say there’s no inflation, but U.S. health care costs have skyrocketed. The annual health care cost for U.S. families is $23,000 vs. $10,000 in 2003. Image: Deutsche Bank Global Research

Central Banks Balance Sheet

Central Banks Balance Sheet Despite years of monetary policy easing, central banks are still missing their inflation goals. Image: Financial Times

Tech Bubble

Tech Bubble Chart suggesting that a second tech bubble could be about to burst. A strange feeling of déjà vu, even if the chart doesn’t take into account inflation-adjusted dollars. Image: Financial Times

U.S. Misery Index and Average Forward Returns

U.S. Misery Index and Average Forward Returns The U.S. misery index (core inflation + unemployment) is approaching all-time low, because both inflation and unemployment are very low. Historically, average forward returns have been higher than the overall S&P 500 average.

Demographics and U.S. 10-year Treasury Yield

Demographics and U.S. 10-year Treasury Yield The trend in global savings has turned. The chart suggests that the dis-saving phase is likely to be inflationary. Image: Gavekal, Macrobond

U.S. Core PCE vs. Fed Target

U.S. Core PCE vs. Fed Target The U.S. core personal consumption expenditures price index, which excludes food and energy, rises to 1.6% in June. Inflation trending back up toward the Fed’s 2% target is good news. You may also like “U.S. Core Inflation Expected Over the Next 21 Months.”

U.S. Population Growth vs. U.S. 10-Year Treasury Bond Yield

U.S. Population Growth vs. U.S. 10-Year Treasury Bond Yield U.S. demographics explain the 10-year Treasury bond yield, due to low inflation. The U.S. 10-year bond yield reflects inflation and growth expectations, and working age population growth contributes to inflation and GDP growth. Image: Paolo Cardena

U.S. Equity Market Performance

U.S. Equity Market Performance since 1914 Excellent comparison between real (adjusted for inflation) and nominal returns on U.S. equities. Image: Saxo Bank

History of the Real Federal Minimum Wage

History of the Real Federal Minimum Wage Today, the real federal minimum wage is worth 31% less than in 1968. It is also the longest period without an increase (adjusted for inflation). You may also like “Wage Growth vs. U.S. Home Price Growth.” Image: Economic Policy Institute